If You Pay Average Freelance Copywriter Rates Will You Get Value for Money?

ValueWherever you look, you’ll see references to averages. Stock markets, house prices, inflation rates, the performance of sports teams… you get the picture. Averages are used to benchmark. When an organisation wants to hire a copywriter to provide business content – perhaps to drive sales or keep customers informed of new services – it’s natural that the person controlling the purse strings will want to know about average freelance copywriter rates.

If you hire only on the basis of average, expect average results

If you base your project only on attaining business content at average freelance copywriter rates or better, then you should expect no better than average results. This doesn’t mean you need to pay high fees to see your copywriting objectives achieved. However, price is only one element when measuring the value of your copywriter – and, after all, value is what really matters whenever there is money to be spent. (click to tweet)

When you measure the value of your business content, look for the combination of quality and price. And of these two elements, the one that makes the real difference is quality. A common mantra is to go for the highest quality that you can afford – whatever it is that you are investing in – but what you really want is the highest possible quality at the lowest possible price. That’s the magic formula that determines value.

How do you measure the quality of your business content?

Writing is an emotive commodity. In other words, how good it is, is more a question of subjectivity than objectivity. It’s the words used and how they are melded that brings an article or blog or eBook to life. And it is that life that resonates with the reader. However, there are some ways to measure how it is valued.

Your business is unique, so you’ll want a copywriter who composes business content that reaches out to your audience. Hire someone who cares – really cares – about your business. You’ll find that such a writer will travel the extra mile for you and your organisation.  He or she will be prepared to spend their own time to learn about your business, products, and services, and the way in which all are best portrayed with the written word.

If you ask a copywriter for samples, remember that they will have been written for someone else. That someone else will be the specific target audience of another client. Probably not your customers. A better way to get a handle on how good a writer will be for your business is to look at what his or her clients say about the writer. Specifically, about the work produced and the working relationship they enjoyed with the writer.

Look for evidence that the writer has been able to adapt style, and has grown with the business over a period of time:

  • You want to hire a writer that evolves with the business and its changing focus, and one that is able to write for a variety of audiences
  • Find a writer who is collaborative, cooperative, and conscientious

Sure you want perfect spelling, grammar and syntax, but great copywriting is way more than this:

Hire creativity, dedication, and composition. Get a writer on board that doesn’t talk to your customers but sits down and shares a tipple with them. A writer that holds your customers’ hands, answers their questions, and massages their egos.

Once you’ve found this, only then should you look at cost. Compare charges to the average freelance copywriter rates, and make sure that you are investing in value. That way you’ll pay no more than average freelance copywriter rates without compromising on quality and hiring no more than an average freelance copywriter.

5 key questions to ask and assess the value of your copywriter

Irrespective of whether you already use the services of a freelance copywriter or are considering doing so for the first time, asking the following five questions will help you assess what value your business content writer is providing:

  • What skills, experience, and ability does the copywriter bring to the table?
  • Does he or she provide creative ideas and solutions to your business content needs?
  • Is he or she able to write for a variety of audiences, in words that resonate with them?
  • Will the writer stay with you for the long haul and evolve as he or she helps your business to grow?
  • How do you measure results?

The best place to find the answers to the first four of these questions is to review what other clients have said about the copywriter. As for the last question… have a look at my article on 7 ways to measure the value your copywriter brings to your business.

So, what are average freelance copywriter rates?

The largest companies often employ their own copywriters in-house (or mistakenly think that an existing member of staff can fill the role). These companies have huge content needs, so the extra expense of employer’s taxes, health and life insurance, desk space, and technology needs becomes more economical.

For small and medium enterprises, hiring a freelance copywriter gives access to expertise as and when required and at a fraction of the cost of hiring someone on a permanent basis.

Rates of pay for a copywriter vary considerably, and depend not only on the experience of the writer but also on the type of writing he or she is required to do. Click on this Freelance Copywriter Rates of Pay Table link to see the average freelance copywriter rates for a variety of business content needs. While it shows the average rates in America, it’s my experience that these rates hold true around the world ($75 =£50).

Contact us today to discover how you will benefit from our real value for money business content writing services:

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